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Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8 (some duplicates have been removed)
, the engine that connects us. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> suarez: rescuers worked in wet weather today to find survivors amid the rubble from the fiery explosion at a texas fertilizer plant last night. late today, authorities acknowledged there were fatalities but declined to confirm how many. earlier estimates ranged from five to 15 though there were reports the toll would go much higher. the cause of the fire and explosion is still not known; officials said today there's no evidence of foul play. a man using his cell phone captured the moment last night when the west fertilizer company plant exploded. that flattened buildings within a five blocks rand sent ockwes outiles around. >> i was actually picked up and th fy bout te end of m
. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> ifill: 27 runners and thousands more spectators had turned out for the boston marathon today when terror erupted. two bombs exploded, and authorities said two people were killed and more than 50 others were wounded. (sirens). within minutes of the blast, wheelchairs and stretchers were ferrying victims up and down boylston street, the home stretch of the oldest marathon race in the world. amid the chaos competitors, race volunteers and spectators ran from the scene in shock. >> i went over there. there were body parts. people were blown apart. they're dead. where the wind owe is, the windows were all blown out. >> ifill: the attack came about three hours after the winners had crossed the finish line. a loud explosion on the north side of the street went
? >> i think that that is true. you're looking at what is going to enable the technology to get to the most patients the quickest and the most reliably. frankly myriad has done a great job of doing that because there are more people who have gotten this test than i think would have gotten it otherwise more consistently and more reliably than if it had been scattered among hundreds of thousands of individual research labs. >> brown: ellen, address that specifically. that claim has been put out there that scholarly work has hardly been stopped. there's been plenty of research done. i mean studies of the research done on this. >> i think those of us in the know will tell you that this has had a chilling effect on research and not as much research has been able to be done. one company has had a monopoly on this testing. for companies and laboratories that wanted to find better ways to look for mutations, faster ways, less expensive ways, they've been stopped. yes, myriad has done a great job of marketing this test to a lot of people because they have a huge financial incentive. but
, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> brown: the chechen-american teenager accused in the boston marathon bombings now faces a possible death sentence. the filing of charges today officially moved the case into the federal courts, even as the city began returning to normal. dzhokhar tsarnaev was arraigned this morning, at boston's beth israel deaconess hospital, where he remained in serious condition. a short time later came word of the complaint, filed by the u.s. justice department. it formally charged the 19-year- old with conspiring to use a weapon of mass destruction, potentially, a capital crime, punishable by the death penalty. and, destruction of property by explosive device, causing death. tsarnaev had been able, sporadically, to answer questions in writing, but a gunshot wound to t
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8 (some duplicates have been removed)